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KCRG TV9 First Alert Forecast For Dubuque and the Tri-States

KCRG TV9 FIRST ALERT FORECAST FOR FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2018 

TODAY:  MOSTLY CLOUDY, WINDY AND COOLER.  FALLING TEMPERATURES.  NORTHWEST

                WIND 15-25 MPH & GUSTY. 

TONIGHT:  MOSTLY CLEAR.  LOW 42.  

TOMORROW:  MOSTLY SUNNY.  HIGH 67.                  

EXTENDED OUTLOOK SUNDAY THROUGH TUESDAY: 

DRY AND MILD AND SUNDAY, A CHANCE OF SHOWERS AND STORMS MONDAY AND TUESDAY.  HIGHS IN THE 60’S & 70’S.  LOWS IN THE 40’S & 50’S. 

MISSISSIPPI RIVER STAGE AT DUBUQUE:  13-FEET & RISING


KCRG Weather Blog

Eastern Iowa rivers forecast to crest this weekend into early next week

Crest levels and times may shift as forecasters get more information about how the water is moving through each river. These are the forecasts as of Thursday afternoon. You can check updated data as it's available at this page. If a location is not listed, it is either because there is no forecast information for there, or because no flooding is expected. Cedar River Cedar Falls - Until Thursday morning. - Flood Stage is 88.0 feet. - Forecast: Rise to 95.2 feet Sunday morning, then fall below flood stage Thursday morning. - Impact: At 94.9 feet, water covers Fitkin Road. Waterloo - Until Tuesday evening. - Flood Stage is 13.0 feet. - Forecast: rise to 17.6 feet Sunday afternoon, then fall below flood stage Tuesday evening. - Impact: At 17.0 feet, many storm sewers are closed along the Cedar River. Vinton - Until Wednesday. - Flood stage is 15.0 feet. - Forecast: Rise to 17.6 feet Monday, then fall below flood stage Wednesday. - Impact: At 17.5 feet, Flood protection measures such as road closures and sandbagging begin. Water affects the intersections of East 2nd Street and 3rd Avenue and North 3rd Avenue and East 3rd Street in Vinton. Cedar Rapids - Until further notice. - Flood stage is 12.0 feet. - Forecast: Rise to 17.3 feet Tuesday, then fall below flood stage late next week. - Impact: At 16.5 feet, Water affects the lowest sections of Ellis Road NW near the Ellis Pool and affects the entrance road to Ellis Boat Harbor on Ellis Road NW in Cedar Rapids. Conesville - Until further notice. - Flood stage is 13.0 feet. - Forecast: Rise to 16.2 feet next Friday morning. - Impact: At 15.5 feet, water affects residences along County Road G28 and affects several gravel roads. Iowa River Marengo - Until further notice. - Flood stage is 14.0 feet. - Forecast: Rise to 16.4 feet next Friday morning. - Impact: At 16.0 feet, water affects agricultural land along the river. Water is several feet deep in places. Columbus Junction - Until further notice. - Flood stage is 19.0 feet. - Forecast: Rise to 22.9 feet Thursday evening. - Impact: At 23.0 feet, water affects residential property along the river south of the Iowa Highway 92 bridge. Turkey River Elkader - Until late Sunday night. - Flood stage is 12.0 feet. - Forecast: The river will continue to fall, dropping below flood stage Sunday morning. Garber - Until Sunday morning. - Flood stage is 12.0 feet. - Forecast: The river will fall below flood stage Saturday. Wapsipinicon River Independence - Until Monday morning. - Flood stage is 12.0 feet. - Forecast: Rise to 13.0 feet Saturday evening, then fall below flood stage Monday morning. - Impact: At 12.0 feet, water affects low-lying streets in Independence. Anamosa - Until Thursday. - Flood stage is 14.5 feet. - Forecast: Rise to 17.9 feet Monday morning, then fall below flood stage Thursday. - Impact: At 18.0 feet, multiple village and township roads are closed.

Rivers go above flood stage for the second time this month

Crest levels and times may shift as forecasters get more information about how the water is moving through each river. These are the forecasts as of Thursday afternoon. You can check updated data as it's available at this page. If a location is not listed, it is either because there is no forecast information for there, or because no flooding is expected. Turkey River Spillville - Until Friday evening. - Flood stage is 9.0 feet. - Forecast: The river will continue to fall, dropping below flood stage by Friday morning. Elkader - Until Sunday morning. - Flood stage is 12.0 feet. - Forecast: The river will continue to fall, dropping below flood stage by Saturday. Garber - Until Saturday evening. - Flood stage is 12.0 feet. - Forecast: The river will rise to 24.1 feet Thursday evening, then fall below flood stage Saturday morning. - Impact: At 19.0 feet, County Road X3C at the south end of Garber becomes inundated. Maquoketa River Manchester - Until Friday morning. - Flood stage is 14.0 feet. - Forecast: Rise to 16.2 feet Thursday evening, then fall below flood stage Friday morning. - Impact: At 15.7 feet, water is on Schram Drive leading to Schram Park. Cedar River Cedar Falls - Until early Thursday morning. - Flood Stage is 88.0 feet. - Forecast: Rise to 94.0 feet Saturday evening, then fall below flood stage early Thursday morning. - Impact: At 93.8 feet, water affects Cedar City. Water covers the road at 216 East Lake Street. Water is on the north edge of the road at 2125 Lone Tree Road. Waterloo - Until Tuesday evening. - Flood Stage is 13.0 feet. - Forecast: rise to 17.0 feet early Sunday morning, then fall below flood stage Tuesday evening. - Impact: At 17.0 feet, many storm sewers are closed along the Cedar River. Vinton - Until Wednesday morning. - Flood stage is 15.0 feet. - Forecast: Rise to 17.0 feet Sunday evening, then fall below flood stage Wednesday morning. - Impact: At 15.0 feet, Agricultural and low land flooding is ongoing. Water affects much of 22nd Avenue Road northwest of Vinton. Cedar Rapids - Until further notice. - Flood stage is 12.0 feet. - Forecast: Rise to 16.5 feet Tuesday morning, then fall below flood stage late next week. - Impact: At 15.5 feet, Water affects the lowest sections of Ellis Road NW near the Ellis Pool and affects the entrance road to Ellis Boat Harbor on Ellis Road NW in Cedar Rapids. Conesville - Until further notice. - Flood stage is 13.0 feet. - Forecast: Rise to 15.8 feet next Thursday morning. - Impact: At 16.5 feet, water affects residences along County Road G28 and affects several gravel roads. Iowa River Marengo - Until further notice. - Flood stage is 14.0 feet. - Forecast: Rise to 16.7 feet next Thursday morning. - Impact: At 16.0 feet, water affects agricultural land along the river. Water is several feet deep in places. Columbus Junction - Until further notice. - Flood stage is 19.0 feet. - Forecast: Rise to 23.0 feet next Thursday morning. - Impact: At 23.0 feet, water affects residential property along the river south of the Iowa Highway 92 bridge. Wapsipinicon River Anamosa - Until Thursday morning. - Flood stage is 14.5 feet. - Forecast: Rise to 16.6 feet Tuesday morning, then fall below flood stage Thursday morning. - Impact: At 16.5 feet, Jungle Town Road is closed.

Beyond the Weather: Changing seasons

The warm and muggy air we have experienced this week is far from the September weather we crave. Cooler, crisp, sweatshirt weather – that classic fall air – arrives just in time for the autumnal equinox. The autumnal equinox occurs Saturday at 8:54 p.m. This is the moment that the sun is directly over the earth’s equator. Day and night are close in time, but we actually have a little more than 12 hours of daylight on the equinox itself. The fall season continues until late December. During this time, the sun transitions to its winter position in the southern sky. With the autumn season in full swing, our next full moon will be our Harvest moon. This occurs on Monday at 8:52 p.m. Happy stargazing!

The Saffir-Simpson Scale doesn’t tell the whole hurricane story

Hurricanes are assigned a category on the Saffir-Simpson Scale from 1 to 5. This scale takes into account the sustained wind speed and nothing else. Rainfall and flooding, storm surge, air pressure, or power outages are not factored into the scale and category number. Flooding is the number one cause of all hurricane-related deaths, not wind. The Saffir-Simpson Scale gives an incomplete picture of a hurricane’s impacts. Hurricane Katrina is one of the benchmarks of hurricane disasters in the United States. Did you know that it made landfall as "only" a category 3 and not a 5? The idea of a lower number translating to a lower threat is understandable. After all, a lower weight, blood pressure, or waist circumference typically means a lower risk of health problems. However, when it comes to hurricanes and even other types of weather, this mindset doesn’t apply. The full story and context matter. This is how local meteorologists can help you understand how big weather events will truly affect where you live.

Monday’s warmth falls short of September’s biggest heat waves

Cedar Rapids made it past the 90-degree mark on Monday, more than 15 degrees above the normal high. While it’s not strange to get to 90 in September, it’s more likely to happen early in the month than it is in the second half of the month. You may recall last September had a late-season heat wave – there were six days in the 90s! That was the most since 1960. The record for the most days hitting at least 90 degrees in September is 13, which happened in 1897. There have been many years without hitting 90 in September. In recent times, between 2001 and 2010, there was only one 90-degree day in September (in 2005). Dubuque’s record for 90 or warmer in September is nine days, which happened in 1895 and 1931. In Iowa City, the record is 14 days in 1897. Waterloo’s record matches the one in Cedar Rapids: 13 days in 1897.